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Reviews

"Always intriguing, Tristan Davies's stories depend less on plotting than feeling, less on tangible images than impressionistic moments... For readers who would like to try stories that break the mold, Cake is a flavorful, filling offering."

"Davies's prose technique is indeed dazzling, especially the ease with which he changes—with considerable originality but complete clarity—from one style to another as he moves from one story to another. Davies accurately portrays the behavior and thinking, such as it is, of the educated middle class that runs present-day Baltimore."

"Davies is a damn good writer, possibly one of the best short story writers in contemporary lit. It's impossible to ignore a writer who's so poignant and poetic. Davies' wit and sophistication are just icing on the cake."

"Outstanding... Explores the emotional states of men and women prone to undefined yearning, failed relationships, and occasional employment... Cake, marked by elegant writing and lit by insight in detailing unexpected outcomes, easily persuades the reader to consume every slice."

"Davies is a damn good writer, possibly one of the best short story writers in contemporary lit. It's impossible to ignore a writer who's so poignant and poetic. Davies' wit and sophistication are just icing on the cake."

"Tristan Davies's fiction is a cross between John Cheever and Evelyn Waugh, with a bit of F. Scott Fitzgerald joined in. It's witty, urbane, funny, poignant, and sophisticated. He's a writer with a graceful and immediately readable style and an original, spirited, and incisive take on contemporary life. Cake is a strong and impressive literary debut."

"In his debut collection of short stories, JHU Writing Seminars senior lecturer Tristan Davies explores the complexities of love and relationships in contemporary society in tales that are impressionistsic and dreamlike."

"While Davies' tales are at times bittersweet, they are never saccharine. Neither are the stories neatly tied up with string around a white cardboard box; many of his endings leave the true conclusion of the stories up to the reader's imagination."